Creative Aging Awareness Day

Creative Aging Awareness Day was held at the Rotary Centre for the Arts (RCA) in Kelowna, BC on Friday June 20, 2014. Its mission was “A day-long celebration of your creative life to examine the role that creative expression can play in promoting engagement, healing and wellness for all ages.”

On the approach, I saw HeART Fit painters. HeART Fit is a free drop-in session of Spontaneous Process Painting every Tuesday at the RCA.

It was very busy inside with musical entertainment and creative arts filling the main floor.

The exhibits continued through to the back hall.

There was a weaving demonstration by the Ponderosa Spinners, Weavers & Fibre Artists.

Glass and metal artist Fay Wolfenden had a display of hand-made glass beads, jewellery and mosaics.

Lucie Parent demonstrated her Funky Fabric Sculptures made using Paverpol. She is a Certified Paverpol Instructor.

The Okanagan Quilter’s Guild seemed to be having a lot of fun.

Their display of Fibre Art Journals were especially intriguing.

Jill promoted Learning in Retirement programs.

There was information about the Sing for Your Life Foundation.

It was a busy and well-attended event with many inspiring creative organizations to follow up on!

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Eileen Murray’s Mixed Media

Eileen Murray

On Friday June 6, 2014, Eileen Murray gave 2 workshops on “The Exploration of Incorporating Fabric, Yarn, Papers and Pouring Medium with Your Acrylic Paintings” at the Opus Art Supplies store in Kelowna. I was lucky enough to attend!

Eileen told us about a childhood experience that caused her to shut down creatively. She says we all have a similar story. In Grade 1, Eileen was ‘slammed’ by a teacher because she drew herself with blue hair. She was punished and this taught her that her art wasn’t good enough.

As an adult, she felt disconnected from her artistic side; yet she encouraged creativity in others and bought art supplies for her own children. Children are authentic when they play. “It’s like their soul is projected out into their art,” says Eileen.

Eileen studied Jungian psychology and dream imagery. It wasn’t until she took The Painting Experience course developed by Stewart Cubly that things changed. When she dismissed something that inspired her, she was told: “You are betraying yourself.” Eileen learned that one must dive into creative inspiration rather than run away from it.

Eileen showed us some of her artworks and what she did to achieve results, such as incorporating fabric and thread.

She showed us products that she used, such as glitter, and pouring medium with a resin-like effect.

She showed us the effect of applying bees wax.

And the tools to use with bees wax.

There was a draw for an opportunity to try this technique. Keith Routley won.

In just a few minutes Keith created this masterpiece.

Others were invited to try out the mixed media techniques.

A few people collaborated.

This resulted in a vibrant piece of artwork.

A whimsical piece was also created.

The workshop was very inspiring! I purchased a few products from Opus and have been experimenting with them at home ever since!

To find out more about Eileen Murray and her artwork, visit her website at eileenscreations.ca .

Christian Lipani’s Resin Techniques at Opus

Today, artist Christian Lipani gave his third demonstration this month on resin techniques at Opus in Kelowna. Here, he worked on his painting, Archaeological Discoveries Number 3.

Bordering his painted wood box panel with tape, he mixes a 50/50 solution for a full minute and applies the resin with a foam brush. Ensuring the panel is flat with even coverage, he then hovers a torch over the surface to remove bubbles.

Christian reveals that he paints in series of 50 works. With a concept in mind, he develops each one further, sometimes experimenting with techniques. He also ‘exercises’ daily by sketching for about an hour each day. Often, these sketches develop into the basis for his larger works in acrylic.

While the resin is still malleable, Christian drags strategic lines in acrylic paint to further highlight aspects of the art.

Using his non-dominant (right) hand, Christian explains how he may ‘practice’ a swooping curve hovering above the artwork before actually touching the surface, in order to give the best chance for a perfect landing of what he has in mind. Here, he does just that, with a palette knife.

Moving in for a closer look, we see how Christian ‘engraves’ the resin around certain shapes as it is almost set.

Some of Christian’s other work was displayed in the room, such as Archaeological Discoveries Number 2 in this series, which does not have resin, but has a unique texture created with a palette knife.

In this painting, Christian used high flow acrylics with a needle-like tip.

This is a detail of a painting where Christian has engraved the resin extensively.

Nearer to the finish, Christian was still working on this number 3 in the series as we left the demonstration.

Christian Lipani immigrated to Canada from France in the 1960’s. He works in acrylic and resin on wood panels usually 3×4 feet and larger. He is also a sculptor. (One of his sculptures is pictured in the bottom left hand corner of the first photo at the top of this post.)

Christian has works in the New Moon Gallery and Hambleton Galleries in Kelowna. His work has been shown in Vancouver, Fort Nelson, Fort St John, and Theford Quebec. He has presented workshops in Kelowna, Victoria and Vancouver. Check the Opus website for his upcoming events.

Odette Nicholson’s Collection of Canadian Art Magazine

Canadian Art Magazine 1948 to 1958

Canadian Art Magazine 1948-58 - Odette Nicholson -

Professional visual artist, design consultant and renovation contractor Odette Nicholson has a vintage collection of Canadian Art Magazines. After she’s finished reading them all cover-to-cover, she plans to find a public access home for them.

Left: Cover of Summer 1953  |  Right: Cover of Christmas/New Year 1951/1952

Covers - Canadian Art Magazine - Odette Nicholson

Odette says:

“Serious stuff inside these magazines: art, craft, architecture, industrial and interior design, book illustration, politics, conferences, essays by artists and art historians. There are full colour inserts and reproductions. The magazines cost 35 cents each in 1948. The magazine is living history, full of text and pictures, events and adventures: how art agency began, influence of the commercial and museum gallery systems, corporate sponsorship, marketing, and yes, the good old CBC radio and other broadcasters in early television.”

Odette tells us that the subscription cost for seasonal quartly Canadian Art Magazine in 1955 was $1.50 per year. Below, she shares with us some intriguing photos of the magazine’s contents.

The Winnipeg Ballet in “Visages”

Winnipeg Ballet in Visages, 1949 Canadian Art Magazine - Odette Nicholson

Group of Seven artist Arthur Lismer’s painting, Georgian Bay 1947
in the Christmas 1951 centrefold

Arthur Lismer, Georgian Bay 1947, Christmas 1951 centrefold, Canadian Art Magazine - Odette Nicholson

Canadian designs  |  Left: 1950  | Right: 1954

Canadian designs - Canadian Art Magazine - Odette Nicholson -

Eaton’s ads (remember Eaton’s College Street in Toronto?!)

Eaton's, Canadian Art Magazine - Odette Nicholson -

Canada Packers ads designed by Commercial artist Walter Tier, glued onto the page

Canada Packers ads - Canadian Art Magazine - Odette Nicholson

1952 in memoriam to Group of Seven artist, Lawren Harris

1952 Lawren Harris - Canadian Art Magazine - Odette Nicholson

If you’d like to see more, visit Odette’s Canadian Art Magazine photo album and like her Facebook pages Odette -> Artist Canada and Odette Nicholson Special Projects (you’ll have to log in to your Facebook account). You can also find out more about Odette Nicholson and her art on her website, odette.ca.

Cherryville Vaudeville

The Canadian Only team attended “a dazzling display of heterogeneous splendour designed to educate, edify, amaze and uplift” – at Cherryville’s Vaudeville show on October 19, 2013 in British Columbia. The photo above is a very entertaining tongue-twisting song sung by Kale acting as King Karacticus with his harem, nose powderer and witches.

Angel Thistle performed a beautiful rendition of the Canadian folk song, “The Log Driver’s Waltz“, which I remember as a Canadian vignette played on television circa 1979 (see the original video).

Angel Thistle singing "The Log Driver's Waltz"

Gary Toma performed on various handmade instruments he used, while Master of Ceremonies, Brad, grew a moustache magically, hair-by-hair, throughout the event.

Gary Toma playing handmade instrument while Master of Ceremonies, Brad, looks on

Barb Crebo sang and read poetry from a cat’s point of view.

Barb Crebo

Many others entertained in hilarious and talented ways. Volunteers cooked up and served a pasta feast, with ingredients donated by local businesses. Valuable door prizes and stunning auction items were donated by artists. We were successful on three items we bid on: a framed picture of an Okanagan scene by Ernest Laviolette, a glass sunflower charm bracelet made by Helen Kovacs, and a piece of Raku pottery created by Jen Moore.

For me, the most memorable performance was Doug Becker’s “Little Ms Piggytails” shadow dancing, which had the audience in hysterics!

Someone had left a pretty mask on our table, so I posed for a photo, too. (You can see some of the auction items in the background on the right-hand side.)

Annie Zed

An awesome time was had by all. It’s great when a small community pulls together like this and comes out to support their neighbours and the arts. To find out more about the Cherryville Artisans Association, visit our article about the Cherryville Artisans Shop.