Eileen Murray’s Mixed Media

Eileen Murray

On Friday June 6, 2014, Eileen Murray gave 2 workshops on “The Exploration of Incorporating Fabric, Yarn, Papers and Pouring Medium with Your Acrylic Paintings” at the Opus Art Supplies store in Kelowna. I was lucky enough to attend!

Eileen told us about a childhood experience that caused her to shut down creatively. She says we all have a similar story. In Grade 1, Eileen was ‘slammed’ by a teacher because she drew herself with blue hair. She was punished and this taught her that her art wasn’t good enough.

As an adult, she felt disconnected from her artistic side; yet she encouraged creativity in others and bought art supplies for her own children. Children are authentic when they play. “It’s like their soul is projected out into their art,” says Eileen.

Eileen studied Jungian psychology and dream imagery. It wasn’t until she took The Painting Experience course developed by Stewart Cubly that things changed. When she dismissed something that inspired her, she was told: “You are betraying yourself.” Eileen learned that one must dive into creative inspiration rather than run away from it.

Eileen showed us some of her artworks and what she did to achieve results, such as incorporating fabric and thread.

She showed us products that she used, such as glitter, and pouring medium with a resin-like effect.

She showed us the effect of applying bees wax.

And the tools to use with bees wax.

There was a draw for an opportunity to try this technique. Keith Routley won.

In just a few minutes Keith created this masterpiece.

Others were invited to try out the mixed media techniques.

A few people collaborated.

This resulted in a vibrant piece of artwork.

A whimsical piece was also created.

The workshop was very inspiring! I purchased a few products from Opus and have been experimenting with them at home ever since!

To find out more about Eileen Murray and her artwork, visit her website at eileenscreations.ca .

Advertisements

Christian Lipani’s Resin Techniques at Opus

Today, artist Christian Lipani gave his third demonstration this month on resin techniques at Opus in Kelowna. Here, he worked on his painting, Archaeological Discoveries Number 3.

Bordering his painted wood box panel with tape, he mixes a 50/50 solution for a full minute and applies the resin with a foam brush. Ensuring the panel is flat with even coverage, he then hovers a torch over the surface to remove bubbles.

Christian reveals that he paints in series of 50 works. With a concept in mind, he develops each one further, sometimes experimenting with techniques. He also ‘exercises’ daily by sketching for about an hour each day. Often, these sketches develop into the basis for his larger works in acrylic.

While the resin is still malleable, Christian drags strategic lines in acrylic paint to further highlight aspects of the art.

Using his non-dominant (right) hand, Christian explains how he may ‘practice’ a swooping curve hovering above the artwork before actually touching the surface, in order to give the best chance for a perfect landing of what he has in mind. Here, he does just that, with a palette knife.

Moving in for a closer look, we see how Christian ‘engraves’ the resin around certain shapes as it is almost set.

Some of Christian’s other work was displayed in the room, such as Archaeological Discoveries Number 2 in this series, which does not have resin, but has a unique texture created with a palette knife.

In this painting, Christian used high flow acrylics with a needle-like tip.

This is a detail of a painting where Christian has engraved the resin extensively.

Nearer to the finish, Christian was still working on this number 3 in the series as we left the demonstration.

Christian Lipani immigrated to Canada from France in the 1960’s. He works in acrylic and resin on wood panels usually 3×4 feet and larger. He is also a sculptor. (One of his sculptures is pictured in the bottom left hand corner of the first photo at the top of this post.)

Christian has works in the New Moon Gallery and Hambleton Galleries in Kelowna. His work has been shown in Vancouver, Fort Nelson, Fort St John, and Theford Quebec. He has presented workshops in Kelowna, Victoria and Vancouver. Check the Opus website for his upcoming events.